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No Time To Die Review: Daniel Craig's Bond Era Ends Personal & Explosive

Daniel Craig’s fifth and final outing as Bond is replete with fantastic action sequences and an emotional center despite the final act being shaky.

Originally scheduled to release in April of 2020, No Time to Die (aka, Bond 25) was delayed for a year and a half due to the global COVID-19 pandemic. Before that, the film faced behind-the-scenes delays after Danny Boyle, who was tapped to co-write and direct the film, left the production in late 2018. The road to a theatrical release was a bit rocky, but No Time to Die itself, now directed by Cary Joji Fukunaga from a screenplay co-written by him, Neal Purvis, Robert Wade, Phoebe Waller-Bridge, and Scott Z. Burns, is far more seamless. Daniel Craig’s fifth and final outing as Bond is replete with fantastic action sequences and an emotional center despite the final act being shaky.

James Bond (Craig) is in retirement at the start of the film, living under the radar in Jamaica five years after he left his post as 007 with Madeleine Swann (Léa Seydoux). However, his old life beckons him to return after CIA agent Felix Leiter (Jeffrey Wright) shows up to ask for his help in rescuing kidnapped Russian scientist Valdo Obruchev (David Dencik). Naturally, nothing is as simple as it seems, with Bond thrown back into the danger and action that comes with the license to kill, all while having to adjust to the changes that occurred in his absence — including a new operative, Nomi (Lashana Lynch), who takes over the 007 mantle in his place. Working with M (Ralph Fiennes), Eve Moneypenny (Naomie Harris), Q (Ben Whishaw) and CIA operative Paloma (Ana de Armas), Bond faces off with enemies old (Blofeld, played by Christoph Waltz) and new, the central one being the mysterious Lyutsifer Safin (Rami Malek), a skilled and intelligent enemy with deadly plans and a vengeful vendetta. 

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